The Garden Journals: walkabouts - Redwoodtwig

Brandon Smith (Redwoodtwig)

Going out into the garden is socializing with my plant neighbours. They don't tend to say much in words, but they are very patient about posing for my camera. When I walk about these fields and bits of forest, I often pause to observe and think about what nature is doing. When I later download the photos I try to record what I've learned in the captions.

Going out into the garden is socializing with my plant neighbours. They don't tend to say much in words, but they are very patient about posing for my camera. When I walk about these fields and bits of forest, I often pause to observe and think about what nature is doing. Sometimes I take a photo or two and when I later download the photos I try to record what I've observed and thought about that day.

I call these walkabouts, even though they only sometimes resemble the activity that the Australian aboriginals call a walkabout. I suppose I could call it managing by walking about, a kind of hands-on management technique espoused from time to time in business circles.

From time to time I go out with one of the larger cameras and maybe a tripod with the intent of making good quality photos of what nature is up to. These are also learning expeditions, attempting to identify this plant or the other; seeing how a group of plants are interacting with each other. These walkabouts often result in many hours of photo editing and caption writing. I enjoy both the walking about and the photo editing and captions writing. I enjoy even more the getting to know my plant neighbours better. And I don't do it as often as I'd like to as there seem to be a million and one other interesting things to do in the garden.

An essential part of these walkabout journals is the use of keywords to tie each photo to a specific place in the garden. This mechanism is used to tie these journals to the appropriate physical area in  The Garden Book. much easier. Each chapter in the garden book is dedicated to a specific area of the property and the ecology going on there.

Flags and markers.  In the winter 2014-215  I located 64 observation points and made 360 degree panoramic images from each one.  I marked each one with a numbered flag.  However, I also tie orange or yellow ribbons to the new trees or shrubs I've planted, mostly natives from the state nursery. 



OP28 setup

Setup for photos from observation point 28.